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  • Dr. Ruzicka

It is Invisible, It is Harmful and It is Light

Updated: May 3, 2019


THE FACTS

Blue light is visible light that has shown to be harmful and beneficial to the eye.


The Good → In proper doses, regulates our sleep cycle.

The Bad (high-energy visible light)→ Long periods of exposure can lead to insomnia, poor sleeping patterns, macular degeneration, and cataracts.


EXPOSURE

Naturally by the sun and artificially by Fluorescent/LED light bulbs, and LED screens (tablets, cell phones, computers, TVs)


AT RISK?

Children, after cataract surgery patients and patients with Aphakia, are at highest risk. Then teenagers, young adults and everyone else in that order.



HOW TO PROTECT YOUR FUTURE

Eyewear

Blue light filtering coating that blocks the wavelengths 380-450nm aka high energy visible light-HEV
Sunglasses (the most blocking are amber or brown tinted lenses)
Yellow colored/tinted lenses


Screen Settings

Will not adequately reduce blue light but aids in reducing the amount of exposure to HEV

How?

  • Use the internet to search for “blue light filter setting on _____.”

  • In the blank space type in your computer processing systems such as MacBook or iPhone or Android phone or Windows 10 or Windows XP, and more. (Apple tends to call it night shift and windows night light)

  • Setting the screen to a warmer tone will reduce the amount of emitted blue light. Remember changing from warm to cool is not the same as changing the brightness.

Screen Filter

Talk to your employer about options


Currently, there are no FDA approved or research backed treatment options. There’s still a lot of work to be done in this new topic of the blues. For now we have a few options that aid a small amount. It’s the little things that count here.


I’ll be sure to keep you all posted when new technology comes our way.


SEE YOU ON THE NEXT BLINK, Y'ALL!


#QEpodcast #SeeUxBlink


References


https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/blue-light-has-a-dark-side


Holzman D. C. (2010). What's in a color? The unique human health effect of blue light. Environmental health perspectives, 118(1), A22–A27. doi:10.1289/ehp.118-a2


Tosini, G., Ferguson, I., & Tsubota, K. (2016). Effects of blue light on the circadian system and eye physiology. Molecular vision, 22, 61–72


Vicente-Tejedor, J., Marchena, M., Ramírez, L., García-Ayuso, D., Gómez-Vicente, V., Sánchez-Ramos, C., … Germain, F. (2018). Removal of the blue component of light significantly decreases retinal damage after high intensity exposure. PloS one, 13(3), e0194218. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.019421


Zhao, Zhi-Chun et al. “Research progress about the effect and prevention of blue light on eyes.” International journal of ophthalmologyvol. 11,12 1999-2003. 18 Dec. 2018, doi:10.18240/ijo.2018.12.2

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